Terminology at Skilldrafting

Here's a list of terms that you should know if you're going to be skillfully laying down your hard-earned greenbacks in our contests. So you know, we've left out definitions for many football specific terms trying to concentrate more on the Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues and fantasy football relevant terms. We're assuming if you're here, you already know the basic terms associated with professional football.

Skilldrafting Contest Terminology

Contest or League - This is the skill contest you play where a group of participants assemble virtual teams of real NFL football players through a draft and compete with each other over a specified time period where a winner is discerned from a specified system of scoring that uses the statistical performance of the teams' players in their actual NFL games. For Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues, there is a collection of 12 SuperOwners/teams competing for a cash prize. Together they form the construct of skilled gameplay (drafting) under which you'll compete to achieve the highest number of fantasy points over the course of Weeks 1-16 of the NFL football season. Is your fake football team better than their fake football team? Can my dad beat up your dad? Let's throw them in the fire-ring of death and find out!

SuperOwner - This is you... in professional sports a team Owner has one team in one league so a SuperOwner has multiple teams across multiple leagues (we went out on a limb here and guessed you'd join more than one league draft). Live up to your name... make us proud. You can change your SuperOwner name from year to year however within a specific year it must remain the same. Elsewhere in Fantasy you might hear the word Manager... you won't find that in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues because there is no need for management... that is the beauty of our leagues... you just draft it, own it, sit back and watch... just like if you were big daddy billionaire, Jerrah' Jones.

Team or Roster - This is the collection of players you've acquired through the draft to represent you in a league as a SuperOwner. It is comprised of 20 players that you've researched, interviewed and worked out prior to hand-selecting them through the draft. They will compete against the other teams in that league for the highest number of fantasy points... and your respect. Treat them well and you shall rejoice in the spoils of fantasy victory. Treat them poorly and... well, that will hurt their feelings. They have feelings too you know.

Draft - This is the formal process of selecting players to a team to compete with other teams that are also selecting players. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues have various drafts starting at all different times, occurring at different speeds and operating in various scoring systems. Our drafts include 12 SuperOwners/teams in each league and there will be 20 rounds of the draft... meaning every team will pick one player per round resulting in 20 players per team. SuperOwners will have no more than one team in each league/draft giving you the ultimate in competition but keeping odds just right that with some skill, research and preparation you can beat the field and score some kaysh!

Scoring - This is the numeric gain for a player/team in a specified system using statistical performance from the players participating in actual NFL games. This scoring is what determines Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues' winners. The specific scoring system that Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues uses can be found on our Rules page.

Starters, Lineup, or Starting Lineup - These are the players on your team who's fantasy points will count toward your weekly total to compete against the other teams in your league. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues will use its software to determine which players on your team scored the most points at each position each week and use them as the starters for your team. You don't have to make any roster decisions... just sit back and watch the magic happen. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues will use the following positional mix for your starters, selecting the highest fantasy scorers for each week: 1 Quarterback, 2 Wide Receivers, 2 Running Backs, 1 Tight End and 1 Defense/Special Teams. Each team consists of 20 players so every week you'll have no more than 7 starters' points counting toward your weekly total.

Reserve or Bench Players - These are the players on your team who's fantasy points will not count toward your weekly total to compete against the other teams in your league. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues will use its software to determine which players on your team scored the most points at each position each week and if a player does not score enough to be considered a starter, that player's points will not be counted toward anything for the week. Each team consists of 20 players so every week you'll have no more than 13 reserves.

Team Defense or Defense/Special Teams - This is a position on your team where position consists of an entire team's defense rather than individual defensive players. You earn points when any player on the defense makes a play that greatly helps the NFL football team to better their odds of winning the game such as recording a sack, interception, fumble recovery, safety or touchdown as well as keeping the opposing team in the NFL game from scoring points against your defense. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues include special teams players with the team defense so if your special teams' players are responsible for any points scored, you also receive fantasy points for that.

Bank - This is the amount of money you have available to you for joining leagues. You receive this by depositing money from your bank account into your Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues Bank via credit card.

Buy-in, Entry Fee or Cost - This is the amount of money required to join a particular contest.

Exposure or Shares - The number of times you've drafted a certain player or percentage of drafts you've selected a certain player from all your picks across multiple drafts. If you don't diversify your player picks somewhat, an injury, suspension or retirement could hurt your chances in multiple leagues. For example, if you select Peyton Manning in every one of your drafts, you have 100 percent exposure to him. The more exposure you have to a player, the more risk you're putting yourself in. By the way... ♫ “Don't draft him 'cause he's retired.”

Hedging - This is when you attempt to mitigate risk of your overall player portfolio by reducing the number of shares you have in a certain player. For example, when given an opportunity to draft player A, B or C... you start opting for B and C because you've already taken player A in various prior drafts.

Humperdinck - This is someone that pays money to join an Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues contest then doesn't draft their team, making everyone sit around and wait until that less-than-SuperOwner's time runs out and the draft can finally continue. Thanks for your money there buttercup but please get your priorities straight.

Type Of League

Type - This is a category of people or things having common characteristics, interchangeable with “kind.” This is used to explain the TYPE of Fantasy League (Season-Long league, Daily Fantasy Sports league or Offseason Fantasy Football League).

Season-Long League - This is a LEAGUE TYPE where participants select a team using various draft styles, draft formats, scoring systems and roster maintenance methods. The scoring takes place over a specified length of time (primarily an entire NFL regular season schedule that usually excludes week 17 for various reasons). The participants compete for any number of prizes including bragging rights, trophy, etc.

*This league type also has sub-types of Keeper League (specific number of players can be kept by a team beyond one season for any number of years... the rest go into a pool to be drafted each year), Dynasty league (most/all players can be kept by a team beyond one season for any number of years and teams are quite large meaning most relevant NFL players are on a team... only NFL rookies go into a pool to be drafted each year) and Re-Draft league (no players can be kept by a team from one season to the next... all players go into a pool to be drafted each year).

Daily Fantasy Sports League or DFS League - This is a LEAGUE TYPE where entrants draft/choose a team of players using a specialized salary cap format (explained below). The scoring takes place over a specified length of time or slot of NFL games where those games primarily take place over the course of 24-48 hours or one week of NFL games. The entrants compete for cash prizes or entries into larger contests, etc. Skilldrafting.com is NOT a DFS site! We do not offer that here. Our leagues are a great complement though to both your DFS leagues and your season-long leagues because there is no maintenance in-season and drafts occur before the season starts, before you get heavy in to those other leagues. It's like bacon, macaroni and cheese... the perfect trifecta.

Offseason Fantasy Football Leagues Contest or O.F.F. League - This is a LEAGUE TYPE where you as a SuperOwner draft your team(s) through a Selection style draft (explained below) using a Serpentine draft format (explained below) that is 20 rounds (explained below) in length with various times of your choosing between picks. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues use either a PPR (explained below) or a Standard (explained below) scoring system. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues use a Draft-Only method of roster maintenance (explained below) and a Best Ball scoring sub-system (explained below). Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues take place over the course of Weeks 1-16 of the NFL season and SuperOwners compete for cash prizes.

*A note on the term Best Ball... this term is often used to describe the “type” of league such as Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues, however, Best Ball actually refers to (in relation to scoring) the system used for determining the starting lineup on a team for a given week whether that be through a team manager's pre-week decisions on who they'll slot into their starting lineup or a software's post-week calculation whereas the optimal starting lineup based solely on points scored would be calculated then chosen by the software.

Style of Draft

Style - This is a manner of doing something, a distinctive appearance, typically determined by the principles according to which something is designed. This is used to explain the STYLE of Fantasy Draft (Selection/Basic draft, Auction/Bid draft or Quasi-style drafts such as Mock drafts and Salary Cap drafts associated with DFS).

*A note on additional details of a fantasy draft... drafts occur in all different ways such as offline (in-person with face-to-face interaction or maybe via web-conference) vs. online (everyone online in a virtual draft-room), live (draft occurs all at once, start to finish with or without the help of a computer keeping track of all picks or bids won) vs. email (draft takes place over email over an extended period of time with or without the help of a computer keeping track of all picks or bids won).

Selection or Basic Draft - This is a DRAFT STYLE where all the players selected to each team are chosen by the team manager or SuperOwner and are drafted through a numbered order according to each participant's turn that is pre-determined. This style of draft is the most common and has been around the longest. In Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues, our software will assign each SuperOwner a numbered pick in the draft (1-12) once a contest fills up and this will determine where in the order you'll select your players.

Auction or Bid Draft - This is a DRAFT STYLE where all the players get nominated one at a time by team managers. The team managers then bid money from their bank on the players where the team with the highest bid gets that player on their team. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues doesn't do anything with this style of draft on our site.

*Quasi-Style Drafts – These are drafts that don't exactly fall into one category or another; or their own.

Mock Draft - This is a fantasy football draft that isn't played out during the season but all the other details of the draft are the same as the other styles. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues use only Selection style drafts. Mock Drafts are often used by SuperOwners to practice drafting and prepare for their real drafts in advance. It will help you to practice draft strategy and learn more about where players might be drafted in actual fantasy football drafts because you're drafting against real people putting real money on the line instead of our Mock Draft software... which don't get me wrong, is pretty boss, but it's no Johnny 5.

Salary Cap Draft (selection) - Ok, so this isn't exactly a draft... or a style for that matter, but the process and result works much the same way. On DFS sites you pick your team by choosing according to your salary cap trying to fill your roster without going over your cap. At the end of the process your team is formed and ready to compete. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues doesn't offer any type of DFS leagues or Salary Cap drafts.

Methods of Roster Maintenance

Method - This is a particular form of procedure for accomplishing or approaching something, orderliness of thought or behavior. This is used to explain the METHOD of Roster Maintenance (Draft Only/No Maintenance, Waiver Wire/Default Roster Maintenance or Free Agent Acquisition Budget Roster Maintenance).

*A note on additional details of roster maintenance... various types of leagues use player trading to maintain their rosters as well however this quasi-method doesn't exactly apply in terms of its own category so it was omitted below. Trading is more of an add-on and supplement to the primary methods of roster maintenance described below.

Draft Only or No Maintenance - This is a MAINTENANCE METHOD where there is no maintenance... big surprise there. The players you draft are the players on your team for the entire season. This is the method we use because it is amazing. You won't have to worry about dropping or adding a single player in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues.

Waiver Wire or Default Maintenance - This is a MAINTENANCE METHOD where team managers have the ability to acquire anyone from a pool of players not currently on another team through a numbered order, time period and duration pre-determined in various ways depending on the league. These players are called free agents until they are acquired by a team. You won't have to worry about using a waiver wire in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues because we are maintenance free.

Free Agent Acquisition Budget or FAAB Maintenance - This is a MAINTENANCE METHOD where team managers receive a pre-determined budget or virtual bank for the year which they use to blind-bid (without knowing the other bids) for a free agent player they want to acquire for their team. The team manager that bid the most money for the player, gets the player. This occurs once per week according to the specifics of that league. You won't have to deal with FAAB roster maintenance in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues.

Format of Drafting

Format - This is a way in which something is arranged or set out. This is used to explain the FORMAT of Draft (Straight/Fixed/Linear draft, Snake/Serpentine draft or Custom draft... like flip ends at the end of the 3rd round or something crazy).

Straight Draft, Fixed Draft or Linear Draft - This is a DRAFT FORMAT where the teams get to select from the draft according to the pre-determined order and once all teams have drafted and the round is over, the selection starts over again in the order that the draft started with. So the order that occurs in the first round will be the same order throughout all rounds of the draft. This is the format used for the NFL Draft. This is NOT the draft format used in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues.

Snake Draft or Serpentine Draft - This is a DRAFT FORMAT where the teams get to select from the draft according to the pre-determined order and once all teams have drafted and the round is over, the selection starts over again in the opposite order that the draft started with. So the order of picks occur in a snaking or serpentine pick sequence from one round of the draft to the next. For example, the first pick in Round 1 has the last pick in Round 2, followed by the first pick in Round 3 (back to back picks going from Round 2 to 3). The team with the last pick in the first round has back to back picks with also the first pick in the second round. We use this format of drafting for all Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues.

Custom Draft - This is a DRAFT FORMAT where the Commissioner may have decided to adjust the order of picks for some reason in an effort to create a satisfying and equitable draft experience for the team managers. As far as draft formats go, using something other than a straight or serpentine format is fairly uncommon.

System of Scoring

*You can find the specific scoring systems that Skilldrafting O.F.F. League Contests use in the rules section of this website.

System or Rules - This is a set of connected things or parts forming a complex whole, a set of principles or procedures according to which something is done; an organized scheme or method. This is used to explain the SYSTEM of Scoring (TD Only scoring, Point Per Reception scoring, Standard scoring, Half Point Per Reception scoring or Custom scoring... which once you really break down all the ins and outs of various scoring systems they are all pretty much customized in some way).

*A note on scoring systems and scoring sub-systems. Every type of league has an organized set of rules that determine how an NFL player's statistics are translated into fantasy points however these systems differ in various ways independent of league type. Every league could be a little different in how exactly the scoring takes place, is calculated and gets recorded. We could be here all day and night going through the various details and intricacies of scoring but for the sake of saving you more time to enter a contest we're only going to focus on the most popular and major differentiations associated with scoring systems/sub-systems. We would like to make sure you understand though that these are systems of scoring, not types of leagues although many people refer to the scoring system used by their leagues to distinguish them... commonly confusing things for those new to the fantasy world.

Full Point Per Reception Scoring or PPR Scoring - This is a SCORING SYSTEM where one fantasy point is awarded for each successfully completed reception by a player of various positions (RB, WR or TE) during a game. This is the system Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues use for our PPR contests. This is one of two major scoring systems used by contests of Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues (the other is Standard... see Standard). Aside from this component, the rest of the details of scoring for a fantasy league can vary greatly. This is just a major scoring system so we felt it necessary to include. Hey, by the way, do yourself a favor and stop referring to this format as a Full Point PPR... it's redundant... stop doing that... just stop it.

Half Point Per Reception Scoring, .5PPR Scoring or ½ PPR Scoring - This is a SCORING SYSTEM just like PPR Scoring only half of a fantasy point is awarded rather than a full point for each successfully completed reception. This scoring system is not used by Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues. Aside from this component, the rest of the details of scoring for a fantasy league can vary greatly. This is just a major scoring system so we felt it necessary to include. And yes, same goes for this one... it isn't called a Half Point PPR.

Standard Scoring - This is a SCORING SYSTEM where no additional fantasy points are awarded for successfully completed receptions by players. This is the system Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues use for our Standard contests. This is one of two major scoring systems used by contests of Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues (the other is PPR... see PPR). All other scoring in Standard system Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues is the same as PPR aside from the point per reception component. The rest of the details of scoring for a fantasy league can vary greatly. This is just a major scoring system so we felt it necessary to include.

Touchdown Only Scoring - This is a SCORING SYSTEM where players are only awarded fantasy points based on whether or not they score an NFL touchdown. This scoring system is not used by Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues. Aside from this component, the rest of the details of scoring for a fantasy league can vary greatly. This is just a major scoring system so we felt it necessary to include. We are also including this one for nostalgic reasons. From what's known about fantasy football history... the first fantasy football league was called the Greater Oakland Professional Pigskin Prognosticators League (GOPPPL) and it began in 1963. It used a Touchdown Only scoring system in the beginning.

Custom Scoring - Like we said earlier... basically every system is “custom” in its own right. The systems come in many variations with numerous details such as different roster mixes (2 quarterbacks vs. 1, 3 wide receivers vs. 2, flex positions or kicker positions), different amounts of fantasy points given for different NFL statistics (4 fantasy points awarded for a passing touchdown vs. 6 or -2 fantasy points awarded for an interception vs. -1... this is actually the category that PPR falls into) or even different ways of fantasy point calculation (partial fantasy points awarded vs. just rounding up or down, allowing for NFL stat corrections to play a part vs. not or how a starting lineup is determined through pre-week decision vs. post-week calculation also known as “Best Ball” vs. automatic also known as how DFS does it because their starting lineup is their whole roster). The important thing to remember in all this is to just know the system well for whatever league you are a part of... so you can skillfully draft the players that will benefit the most from those scoring rules.

Helpful Draft Terms

ADP - This is the abbreviation for Average Draft Position. This player ranking is the average round and pick in which a player is typically chosen during a fantasy football draft. It is basically the value of a player and how well they are expected to perform over the course of the season based on user perception and when users are willing to select them in drafts. The lower the number, the more valuable the player. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues will be providing free to everyone the real-time data of average draft position values... because we're awesome.

Round - This is a numbered, finite portion of a fantasy draft which ultimately determines the length of the entire draft. Each round consists of a pick for each team in the league so for all Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues a round consists of 12 picks (because there are 12 teams in each league). Each Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues contest also has 20 rounds, resulting in 20 players being selected to each team. This term does not mean Eddie Lacy circa 2015.

Pick - This is a selection of a player in your draft that you'd like to add to your team. It is also known as the specifically ordered turn at which you'll make a draft selection. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues offers various time durations to make your pick depending on which contest you enter be it a 3 hour limit pick or a 6 hour limit pick.

Projections - This is the whole of predicted statistics a player will have for the year. This is ascertained through a calculation of various aspects of analysis and will probably be wildly different depending on who's calculating those statistics. This is generally used to help determine player rankings and tiers. The projections help to determine a player's value prior to the season.

Ranking - This is a numerical ordering of players based on expected fantasy production usually determined by calculated projections. The nice thing for you is that you don't have to do all this crazy finger-counting... we've done that for you already and you'll see who is expected to do well as you draft with our exclusive player rankings.

Tiers or Tiering - This is when you lump a group of players together by assumed fantasy production for the upcoming year so that within each group those players are interchangeable, meaning you don't have a major preference which player in the tier you draft because you're expecting them all to have similar performance. This allows you to not get so caught up on individuals and throw off your fantasy drafting strategy. Depending on situation, you can just make sure you get say the last player in each tier giving you ultimate value as you draft.

Zero RB - This is a draft strategy where you wouldn't use a draft pick on the running back position for multiple rounds to start the draft with the idea that running backs are devalued in the NFL now due to the prevalence of higher volume passing offenses, team attempts at mitigating injury and the more pronounced usage of specialized backs specifically suited for 3rd down roles of blocking or catching passes. This draft strategy aligns with the thought that points from that position are easier to come by than other positions so you can wait to draft them.

RB Heavy or WR Heavy - This is a draft strategy to select multiple players at a certain position either in the beginning of the draft or overall because you feel there is a benefit to doing so. These strategies can be implemented especially in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues from one contest to the next because your draft picks will remain on your team throughout the season, allowing you to test your strategy and drafting skill.

Stats or Statistics - This is a player's numerical accomplishments for a given period of time. These translate into fantasy points by way of yards gained through throwing, catching and running the football as well as scoring touchdowns and various defensive efforts. We nerds eat this stuff up.

Additional Fantasy Lingo

Commissioner - This is a person that has been agreed upon by league members to regulate or officiate various aspects of the league. This person is usually participating in the fantasy football league but not always. They have many talents and obligations but quite often are in charge of things like making official determinations on rules, handling complaints or disagreements, handling any cash or prizes that might be involved and/or delivering communication regarding various aspects of the league and/or draft. We are the Commissioner of Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues and we'll handle any issues that arise.

Home-Town League - This is a common reference to whatever actual type of league you are in that explains the individuals that participate. Usually this refers to friends, family members or co-workers from say a “Home Town” of origin. These are generally season-long leagues and not DFS but could be any variety of type, draft style/format, scoring system, etc.

League Of Record - This is a common reference to what is usually a season-long fantasy league where a person spends most of their time, effort and passion. It is the league that is most important to the person and the one that “matters.” This could also apply to a SuperOwner's very special Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues contest.

Free Agent - This is a player who just like in the NFL, is not on a team so they are free to be picked up and used... however this doesn't apply in Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues because we do not have fantasy free agents... only actual NFL free agents that aren't currently signed to a team that you might stumble across in your draft. Careful, if they aren't signed to an NFL team, they may not get any playing time this year.

Trade - A transaction that involves the barter of one or more players from one team to another in the interest of both teams being improved by this player exchange.

Flex Position - This is a lineup spot that can be occupied by more than one position, typically by a RB, WR or TE. Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues don't currently use a flex position in any of its leagues.

Hedge - Actions and strategies deployed to reduce the overall risk (usually resulting in the reduction of potential reward as well) of losing a large portion of your bankroll. For example, you can hedge your main lineup with a second lineup with completely different players.

Fade - When you start to avoid drafting a certain player or players from a specific team all together or maybe at their current value/average draft position. This is generally done either because you think you know something negative about a player that others don't, you're a glass-half-empty kind of person, you don't want the risk on your team, etc.

Value or Bargain - This is when a player is drafted in a later pick than the player's expected fantasy production would be deserving of.

Fall or Underdrafted - This is when a player is expected to be selected/picked in a certain range of a draft based on their average draft position, expected fantasy production and/or grouping among similar players of the same caliber/position but due to various circumstances, the player gets drafted later than expected.

Reach - This is when a player is drafted in an earlier pick than the player's expected fantasy production would be deserving of.

Pushed Up or Overdrafted - This is when a player is expected to be selected/picked in a certain range of a draft based on their average draft position, expected fantasy production and/or grouping among similar players of the same caliber/position but due to various circumstances, the player gets drafted earlier than expected.

Ceiling - This is the best possible outcome for a particular player. This usually refers to a numerical or statistical result of how effective that player is going to be that season. Ceiling is the opposite of Floor.

Floor - This is the worst possible outcome for a particular player. This usually refers to a numerical or statistical result of how effective that player is going to be that season. Floor is... you guessed it, opposite of Ceiling.

Punt - In fantasy lingo, this is where you decide to draft players in a specific position very late to collect better players in other positions that you see as having more value and likelihood to help your overall score over the course of the season. For example, you may punt on the Tight End position by not selecting any in the first 15 rounds of a draft then pick up three in a row that are all not very likely to be great but between the three players you feel you can get the points needed week to week in that spot and by doing this you've been able to add more high value positions earlier in the draft because you did not spend those picks on a Tight End earlier.

Upside - This is a player's potential to be better than expected, better than an average player or better than their performance in previous years.

Downside - This is a player's potential to be worse than expected, worse than an average player or worse than their performance in previous years.

Breakout Candidate - This is a player that has a high likelihood that they will perform better than expected, better than an average player at that position or better than their previous years' performance. The idea here is also that this player has never done this in the past and usually applies to younger players. A breakout candidate has high upside and a player with high upside may be a breakout candidate... see what we did there?

Skill Position Player - This is a player that plays offense and scores fantasy points (WR, TE, QB, RB)... see the idea there is that those players... that play those positions... require skill to do that... just making sure we're not losing you here.

Regression or Negative Regression - This is usually associated with phrase “regression to the mean”... this is where a statistical variable for a player is extreme enough, that there's a high likelihood that statistical variable will return to an outcome more in alignment with what is typically observed. So you could have a really high stat that you expect to regress back down in the future, or a very low stat that you expect to regress back up in the future. When the stat regresses up, that is usually called negative regression or a negatively regressing statistical variable. Hey nerds, give us break, we're trying to explain this stuff but we aren't scientists over here.

BYE Week or On BYE - This is the week during the NFL season where a team gets a game off for that week. Each NFL team plays 16 games in 17 weeks. This is extremely important in the Skilldrafting O.F.F. Leagues because if you don't draft more than one player in a specific position, for example Defense/Special Teams, when your team is on BYE, they won't be playing and you'll receive zero points for them that week. This can also be an issue if you do have more than one player at a position however your players have the same BYE Week and therefore you have the same issue of receiving zero points because none of your players were playing that week. Don't do that... that would not be good.

Cheat Sheet - This is a prepared list of players you want to draft that are ranked or tiered in order of fantasy value. You can create one of these yourself or just use our rankings we provide in-draft to help you assemble the best team. We put a lot of time and effort into ranking our players so you have a little help to win your leagues.

Handcuff - This is a clear-cut backup player that would replace the starter on an NFL football team if the starter were to get injured, suspended, etc. This handcuff would be expected to receive the largest portion or all of that starter's playing time and therefore expected fantasy production in their place. You mitigate your risk of lost points in the event your starter misses time assuming the replacement player has a high probability that they'll perform well also. This is most relevant to the running back position but sometimes can be applied to other skill positions. This term is not a derogatory reference to Joseph Randle.

Flier or Taking A Flier - This is taking a gamble on a player by drafting them because they have high potential but also carry a high risk. Many times, these players come in the form of backups, players coming off injury, or rookies.

Injured Reserve - This is a sports playing status designation for football that for all intents and purposes ends a player's season. This will mean the player won't be scoring any more fantasy points for the season. This is no fun for anyone.

Probable, Questionable or Game-Time Decision - These are sports playing status designations for football that aren't the same thing but for our purposes means the player is or was injured and playing time may be impacted. It's a long season though, so the good news is there's a chance they'll be back playing relatively soon with these statuses.

Doubtful or Out - This is a sports playing status designation for football that means there's a high likelihood or certainty that the playing time for this player will be impacted negatively and may be an issue for the future. If the player is listed out specifically, the player will not be playing in the upcoming football game.

FML - This is an abbreviation for a phrase that usually comes to mind when some variety of sports injury has befallen one of your players. This can range from potentially multi-week injuries such as sprains, strains and pulls of soft/semi-soft body tissues such as muscles, tendons and ligaments to concussions and finally, full-on, gun-in-the-mouth tears, breaks and ruptures of various body parts that shelf our fragile athletes for weeks, months and even full seasons.

Hype or Hype Train - This is a term for the overly exaggerated state of a player's popularity and usually their associated positive expectations for fantasy production. See also Quad City DJ's... n' ride it.

Sleeper - This is a player that exceeds his expected fantasy production in a substantial fashion but is a player that prior to performing that way didn't receive the typical amount of publicity or attention that other players of his caliber had.

Deep Sleeper - This is similar to a sleeper however this term would apply to players that are even more obscure and even less likely to have substantial fantasy production.

Super Deep Sleeper - This is similar to a deep sleeper however this term would apply to players that are virtually never talked about in the media and have an extremely low probability of even being relevant let alone delivering substantial fantasy production.

Post Hype Sleeper - This is a phenomenon where a player became extremely popular then for various reasons such as injury, poor performance, suspension, etc. his popularity fell to a level where the media stopped talking about him and/or believing he could deliver substantial fantasy production, to the point where he'd be now considered a sleeper.

Elite or Stud - This is a term for the players that consistently perform at a level of fantasy production that is higher than everyone else. You like these guys... you want these guys... you need these guys.

Boom or Bust - This is a term for the players that have a high probability to score either a substantially high amount of fantasy points in a given week or a substantially low amount of fantasy points in a given week. These players generally don't score somewhere in the middle very often and aren't consistent from week to week. Frequently, these players are goal-line specialized running backs or wide receivers that specialize in running deep routes.

I'm sure you may know one or two more but the internet is running out of space so we'll cut it short here.